Paneuropean research on dictionary use [in English and Greek]

Η Λεξιμανία (όπως και πολλά άλλα portal σχετικά με τη γλώσσα) σας προσκαλεί να συμμετέχετε στην πανευρωπαϊκής κλίμακας έρευνα για τη χρήση των λεξικών. Συμμετάσχετε συμπληρώνοντας ένα σύντομο ερωτηματολόγιο: που θα βρείτε εδώ. Για να μπορέσει να συμπεριληφθεί μία γλώσσα στην έρευνα αυτή χρειάζεται να έχουν συμπληρωθεί τουλάχιστον 100 ερωτηματολόγια. Βοηθήστε κι εσείς να συμπεριληφθεί η ελληνική συμπληρώνοντας το ερωτηματολόγιο! Σας ευχαριστούμε!   Leximania (as well as other portals on language) invites you to participate on a paneuropean research concerning the use of dictionaries. You can participate by filling out…

European survey on dictionary use

  On May 8th 2017, we have launched a large scale European survey on dictionary use, which will be conducted in 29 countries and in 26 different languages. The survey is led by Iztok Kosem (University of Ljubljana and Trojina Institute), Carolin-Müller Spitzer (Institut für Deutsche Sprache), Robert Lew (Adam Mickiewicz University) and Sascha Wolfer (Institut für Deutsche Sprache) and involves 58 researchers. The survey aims to explore the attitude of language users towards general monolingual dictionaries of their native language. The survey is conducted with the support of the…

Lookups For ‘Betrayal’ Spike After Reporters Ask Spicer To Define the Word

JAN 31, 2017  Spicer: ‘I’m not going to define the word’ Lookups for betrayal spiked on January 31, 2017. During a contentious press conference, President Trump’s press secretary Sean Spicer used the word betrayal to describe the firing of Acting Attorney General Sally Yates for refusing to order the Justice Department to defend the executive order regarding immigration. One reporter asked, “Is it a betrayal? That’s a very odd word,” and another asked, “Why use the word betrayal?” Finally, a reporter asked Spicer, “Define the word betrayal” to which he…

[Article] WHO IS THE GENIUS BEHIND MERRIAM-WEBSTER’S SOCIAL MEDIA? – IN CONVERSATION WITH A DICTIONARY

In case you hadn’t noticed, Merriam-Webster’s Twitter game is strong—topical, funny, smart, and informative while also being relentlessly irreverent. Not what you’d necessarily expect from the social media account of a dictionary. (This is putting aside the fact that we now generally expect things like dictionaries to have social media accounts, of course.) But if you were ever a nerd who thought of the dictionary as your best friend (just me?)—well, this is sort of like that dictionary has finally come to life and loves you back and also tweets about words all…

Green’s Dictionary of Slang Comes Online

Green’s Dictionary of Slang Comes Online By Jonathon Green Love the internet or see it as the devil’s playground, there’s one thing for which it seems the dream home: reference. Dictionaries, encyclopedias, all those thick, square tomes of yesteryear, in my case the three volumes that made up the 2010 print edition of Green’s Dictionary of Slang are surely over. The mighty OED, halfway through its revision, would currently need 40 volumes. It’s not going to happen, any more than I or any publisher would consider an expanded print version…